WCP1842

Letter (WCP1842.1732)

[1]

Down

Bromley

Kent

April 6 / [18]59

My dear Mr Wallace

I this morning received your pleasant & friendly note of Nov. 30th.1 The first part of my M.S is in Murray's hands to see if he likes to publish it.2 There is no preface, but a short Introduction, which must be read by everyone, who reads my Book. The second Paragraph in the Introduction, I have had copied verbatim2.5 from my foul copy, & you will, I hope, think that I have fairly noticed your paper in Linn. Transacts.3 —You must remember that I am now publishing [2] only an Abstract & I give no references. — I shall of course allude to your paper on Distribution; & I have added that I know from correspondence that your explanation of your law is the same as that which I offer. — You are right, that I came to [the] conclusion that Selection was the principle of change from study of domesticated productions; & then reading Malthus4 I saw at once how to apply this principle. — Geographical Distrib[ution]. & Geological relations of extinct to recent inhabitants of S. America first led me to [the] subject. Especially [the] case of Galapagos Isl[an]ds. —

I hope to go to press in [the] early [3] part of next month.— It will be [a] small volume of about 500 pages or so. — I will of course send you a copy. I forget whether I told you that Hooker5, who is our best British Botanist & perhaps best in [the] World, is a full convert, & is now going immediately to publish his confession of Faith; & I expect daily to see the proof-sheets. — Huxley6 is changed & believes in mutation of species: whether a convert to us, I do not quite know.— We shall live to see all the younger men converts. My neighbour & excellent naturalist J. Lubbock7 is [an] enthusiastic convert.

I see by Nat[ural]. Hist[ory]8 notices that you are doing great work in the Archipelago; [4] & most heartily do I sympathise with you. For God sake take care of your health. There have been few such noble labourers in the cause of Natural Science as you are.

Farewell, | with every good wish | Yours sincerely | C. Darwin [signature]

P.S.

You cannot tell how I admire your spirit, in the manner in which you have taken all that was done about publishing our papers. I had actually written a letter to you, stating that I would not publish anything before you did had published. I had not sent that letter to the Post, when I received one from Lyell9 & Hooker, urging me to send some M.S. to them, & allow them to act as they thought fair & honourably to both of us. & I did so. —

ARW to Darwin, 30 Nov. 1858. WCP record no. WCP4828.5225. This letter is presumed lost and the text is not known.

Darwin, Charles. 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. London: John Murray.

2.5. This enclosure is missing.

Darwin, Charles, and Wallace, Alfred R.1858 [1859]. On the Tendency of Species to form Varieties; and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection. Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society. Zoology. 3: 45-62.
Malthus, Thomas Robert. 1798 [1826]. An Essay on the Principle of Population, 6th edition. London: Murray. First published anonymously in 1798. The book's 6th edition was independently cited as a key influence by both Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. [Wikipedia. An Essay on the Principle of Population . Accessed 31 Aug. 2018.]
Hooker, Joseph Dalton (1817-1911). British botanist and explorer.
Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825-1895). British biologist known as "Darwin's Bulldog".
Lubbock, John (1834-1913). British banker and polymath.
Some of ARW's letters to his natural history agent Samuel Stevens were published in the Zoologist in 1858 and 1859, and many of his specimens exhibited at meetings of the Zoological and Entomological Societies and reported in their proceedings and in Annals and Magazine of Natural History. See footnote 6 of the Darwin Correspondence Project transcript of this letter at <http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-2449> [accessed 5 Sept. 2018].
Lyell, Charles (1797-1875). British lawyer and geologist.

Published letter (WCP1842.5925)

[1] [p. 136]

LETTER IV

C. DARWIN TO A. R. WALLACE

Down, Bromley, Kent. April 6, 1859.

My dear Mr. Wallace,— I this morning received your pleasant and friendly note of Nov. 30th. The first part of my MS.1 is in Murray's hands, to see if he likes to publish it. There is no Preface, but a short Introduction, which must be read by everyone who reads my book. The second paragraph in the Introduction2 I have had copied verbatim from my foul copy, and you will, I hope, think that I have fairly noticed your papers in the Linnean Transactions.3 You must remember that I am now publishing only an Abstract, and I give no references. I shall of course allude to your paper on Distribution;4 and I have added that I know from correspondence that your explanation of your law is the same as that which I offer. You are right, that I came to the conclusion that Selection was the principle of change from study of domesticated productions; and then reading Malthus I saw at once how to apply this principle. Geographical distribution and geographical relations of extinct to recent inhabitants of South America first led me to the subject. Especially the case of the Galapagos Islands. I hope to go to press in early part of next month. It will be a small volume of about 500 pages or so. I will, of course, send you a copy. I forget whether I told you that Hooker, who is our [2] best British botanist, and perhaps the best in the world, is a full convert, and is now going immediately to publish his confession of faith; and I expect daily to see the proof-sheets. Huxley is changed and believes in mutation of species: whether a convert to us, I do not quite know. We shall live to see all the younger men converts. My neighbour and excellent naturalist, J. Lubbock, is an enthusiastic convert. I see by Natural History notices that you are doing great work i.n the Archipelago; and most heartily do I sympathise with you. For God's sake take care of your health. There have been few such noble labourers in the cause of natural science as you are. Farewell, with every good wish. — Yours sincerely, C. DARWIN.

P.S.— You cannot tell how I admire your spirit, in the manner in which you have taken all that was done about publishing our papers. I had actually written a letter to you, stating that I would not publish anything before you had published. I had not sent that letter to the post when I received one from Lyell and Hooker, urging me to send some MS. to them, and allow them to act as they thought fair and honourably to both of us. I did so.

A footnote here reads: "The Origin of Species".
A footnote here reads: "First Edit., 1859, pp. 1, 2."
A footnote here reads: "On the Tendency of Species to form Varieties and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection." By C. Darwin and A. R. Wallace. Communicated by Sir C. Lyell and J. D. Hooker. Journ. Linn. Soc., 1859, iii. 45. Read July 1st, 1858."
A footnote here reads: ""On the Law which has regulated the Introduction of New Species." Ann. and Mag. of Nat. Hist., 1855, xvi. 184."

Published letter (WCP1842.6890)

[1] [p. 222]

DOWN, BROMLEY KENT.

April 6, 1859.

MY DEAR MR WALLACE,

I this morning received your pleasant and friendly note of Nov. 30. The first part of my MS. is in Murray's hands to see if he likes to publish it. There is no preface, but a short Introduction, which must be read by everyone who reads my Book. The second Paragraph in the Introduction I have had copied verbatim from my foul copy 1, and you will, I hope, think that I have fairly noticed your paper in Linnean Transactions — you must remember that I am now publishing only an abstract and I give no references. I shall of course allude to your paper on [2] [p. 223] Distribution: and I have added that I know from correspondence that your explanation of your law is the same as that which I offer. You are right that I came to [the] conclusion that Selection was the principle of change from study of domesticated productions; and then reading Malthus I saw at once how to apply this principle. Geographical Distribution and Geological relations of extinct to recent inhabitants of S. America first led me to [the] subject. Especially [in the] case of Galapagos Islands. I hope to go to press in [the] early part of next month. It will be [a] small volume of about 500 pages or so. I will of course send you a copy. I forget whether I told you that Hooker, who is our best British Botanist and perhaps best in [the] World, is a full convert, and is now going immediately to publish his Confession of Faith; and I expect daily to see the proof-sheets. Huxley is changed and believes in mutation of species: whether a convert to us, I do not quite know. We shall live to see all the younger men converts. My neighbour and excellent naturalist J. Lubbock is enthusiastic convert. I see by Natural History notices that you are doing great work in the Archipelago; and most heartily do I sympathise with you. For God's sake take care of your health. There have been few such noble labourers in the cause of Natural Science as you are. Farewell, with every good wish

Yours Sincerely, | C. DARWIN.

P.S. You cannot tell how I admire your spirit, in the manner in which you have taken all that was done about publishing our papers. I had actually written at letter to [3] [p. 224] you, stating that I would not publish anything before you had published. I had not sent that letter to the Post when I received one from Lyell and Hooker, urging me to send some MS. to them, and allow them to act as they thought fair and honourably to both of us.— I did so.

Please cite as “WCP1842,” in Beccaloni, G. W. (ed.), Ɛpsilon: The Alfred Russel Wallace Collection accessed on 23 May 2024, https://epsilon.ac.uk/view/wallace/letters/WCP1842