WCP1857

Letter (WCP1857.4054)

[1]

5, Westbourne Grove Terrace, W.

May 10th. 1864

My dear Darwin

I was very much gratified to hear by your letter of a month back that you were a little better, & I have since heard occasionally through Huxley1 & Lubbock2 that you are not worse. I sincerely hope the summer weather & repose may do you real good.

The Borneo Cave exploration is [2] to go on at present without a subscription. The New British Consul3 who is going out to Sarawak this month will undertake to explore some of the caves nearest the town, & if any thing of interest is obtained a good large sum can no doubt be raised for a thorough exploration of the whole country.— Sir J. Brooke4 will give every assistance & will supply men for the preliminary work.

I send you now my little contribution to the theory [3] of the origin of man — I hope you will be able to agree with me — If you are able I shall be glad to have your criticisms. I was led to the subject by the necessity of explaining the vast mental & cranial differences between man & the apes combined with such small structural differences in other parts of the body, — & also by an endeavour to account for the diversity of human races combined with man’s almost perfect stability of form during all historical epochs — [4] It has given me a settled opinion on these subjects, if nobody can shew5 a fallacy in the argument.

The Anthropologicals did not seem to appreciate it much, but we had a long discussion which appears almost verbatim in the "Anthropolog. Review".6

As the Linnean Transactions will not be out till the end of the year I sent a pretty full abstract of the more interesting parts of my Papilionidae paper to the "Reader" which as you say is a splendid paper —7

Trusting Mrs. Darwin8 & all your family are well & that you are improving Believe me | Yours most sincerely | Alfred R. Wallace [signature]

C. Darwin Esq.

Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825-1895). British biologist known as "Darwin's Bulldog".
Lubbock, John (1834-1913). British banker and polymath.
Ricketts, George Thorne (1826-1919). British consul at Sarawak 1864 and Manilia 1866.
Brooke, James (1803-1868). British-born Rajah of Sarawak.
Archaic form of show.
Wallace, A. R. 1864. The Origin of Human Races and the Antiquity of Man Deduced From the Theory of "Natural Selection." Journal of the Anthropological Society of London. 2: clviii-clxx.
The article-length abstract was published in The Reader, 16 April 1864 and the full work was later printed by the Linnean Society. (see: Wallace, A. R. 1864. On the phenomena of variation and geographical distribution as illustrated by the Papilionidae of the Malayan region. Transactions of the Linnean Society of London. 25: 1-71.)
Darwin, Emma (née Wedgwood) (1808-1896). Wife and first cousin of Charles Darwin.

Transcription (WCP1857.1747)

[1]1

5, Westbourne Grove Terrace, W.

May 10th.1864.

My dear Darwin,

I was very much gratified to hear by your letter of a month back that you were a little better, & I have since heard occasionally through Huxley & Lubbock that you are not worse. I sincerely hope the summer weather & repose may do you real good.

The Borneo Cave exploration is to go on at present without a subscription. The New British Consul who is going out to Sarawak this month will undertake to explore some of the cares nearest the town, & if anything of interest is obtained a good large sum can no doubt be raised for a thorough exploration of the whole country. Sir J. Brooke will give every assistance & will supply men for the preliminary work.

I send you now my little contribution to the theory of the origin of man — I hope you will be able to agree with me — If you are able I shall be glad to have your criticisms.

I was led to the subject by the necessity of explaining the vast mental & cranial differences between man & the apes combined with such small structural differences in other parts of the body, — & also by an endeavour to account for the diversity of human races combined with man’s almost perfect stability of form during all historical epochs.

It has given me a settled opinion on these subjects, if nobody can shew a fallacy in the argument.

The Anthropologicals did not seem to appreciate it much, but we had a long discussion which appears almost verbatim in the "Anthropolog. Review".

As the Linnean Transactions will not be out till the end of the year I sent a pretty full abstract of the more interesting parts of my paper Papilionidae paper to the "Reader" which as you say is a splendid paper. Trusting Mrs Darwin & all your family are well & that you are improving.

Believe me Yours most sincerely | Alfred R. Wallace.

A typewritten copy. "To C. Darwin.)" is typed in the top right-hand corner of the page.

Transcription (WCP1857.4529)

[1]

To C. Darwin.) 5, Westbourne Grove Terrace, W. May 10th. 1864.

My dear Darwin,

I was very much gratified to hear by your letter of a month back that you were a little better, & I have since heard occasionally through Huxley1 & Lubbock2 that you are not worse. I sincerely hope the summer weather & repose may do you real good.

The Borneo Cave exploration is to go on at present without a su subscription. The New British Consul3 who is going out to Sarawak this month will undertake to explore some of the caves nearest the town, & if anything of interest is obtained a good large sum can no doubt be raised for a thorough exploration of the whole county. Sir J. Brooke4 will give every assistance & will supply men for the preliminary work.

I send you now my little contribution to the theory of the origin of man — I hope you will be able to agree with me — If you are able I shall be glad to have your criticisms.

I was led to the subject by the necessity of explaining the vast mental & cranial differences between man & the apes combined with such small structural differences in other parts of the body, — & also by an endeavor to account for the diversity of human races combined with man’s almost perfect stability of form during all historical epochs—

It has given me a settled opinion on these subjects, if nobody can shoe a fallacy in the argument.

The Anthropologicals5 did not seem to appreciate it much, but we had a long discussion which appears almost verbatim in the "Anthropolog. Review".

As the Linnean Transactions will not be out till the end of the year I sent a pretty full abstract of the more interesting parts of my paper Papilionidae paper6 to the "Reader" which as you say is a splendid paper- Trusting Mrs Darwin7 & all your family are well & that you are improving

Believe me | Yours most sincerely | Alfred R. Wallace.

Thomas Henry Huxley, biologist and anatomist, lived 1825 — 1895
John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury, banker and scientist, lived 1834 — 1913
Refers to George Thorne Ricketts, soldier and diplomat, died 1919
James Brooke, Rajah of Sarawak, lived 1803 — 1868
Refers to members of the Anthropological Society of London, founded in 1863 by Richard Francis Burton and James Hunt
Refers to Wallace’s paper titled "On the phenomena of variation and geographical distribution as illustrated by the papilionidae of the Malayan region" which appeared in the Transactions of the Linnean Society in 1865
Emma Darwin (née Wedgwood), lived 1808 — 1896

Published letter (WCP1857.5940)

[1] [p. 152]

5 Westbourne Grove Terrace, W. May 10, 1864.

My dear Darwin,— I was very much gratified to hear by your letter of a month back that you were a little better, and I have since heard occasionally through Huxley and Lubbock that you are not worse. I sincerely hope the summer weather and repose may do you real good.

The Borneo Cave exploration is to go on at present without a subscription. The new British consul who is going out to Sarawak this month will undertake to explore some of the caves nearest the town, and if anything of interest is obtained a good large sum can no doubt be raised for a thorough exploration of the whole country. Sir J. Brooke will give every assistance, and will supply men for the preliminary work.

I send you now my little contribution to the theory of the origin of man. I hope you will be able to agree with me. If you are able, I shall be glad to have your criticisms. I was led to the subject by the necessity of explaining the vast mental and cranial differences between man and the apes combined with such small structural differences in other parts of the body, and also by an endeavour to account for the diversity of human races combined with [2] man's almost perfect stability of form during all historical epochs.

It has given me a settled opinion on these subjects, if nobody can show a fallacy in the argument.

The Anthropologicals did not seem to appreciate it much, but we had a long discussion which appears almost verbatim in the Anthropological Review.1 As the Linnean Transactions will not be out till the end of the year I sent a pretty full abstract of the more interesting parts of my Papilionidae paper2 to the Reader, which, as you say, is a splendid paper.

Trusting Mrs. Darwin and all your family are well, and that you are improving, believe me yours most sincerely, ALFRED R. WALLACE.

A footnote here reads: "1 For March, 1864."
A footnote here reads: "Reader, April 16,1864. An abstract of Wallace's paper "On the Phenomena of Variation and Geographical Distribution, as illustrated by the Papilionidae of the Malayan Region," Linn. Soc. Trans., xxv."

Please cite as “WCP1857,” in Beccaloni, G. W. (ed.), Ɛpsilon: The Alfred Russel Wallace Collection accessed on 7 June 2023, https://epsilon.ac.uk/view/wallace/letters/WCP1857