WCP1862

Letter (WCP1862.4056)

[1]

5, Westbourne Grove Terrace W.

Jan. 31st [1865].1

Dear Darwin

Many thanks for your kind letter. I send you now a few more papers. One on "Man" is not much in your line.2 The other 3 are Bird lists, but in the introductory remarks are a few facts of Distribution that may be of use to you, & as you have them already in the Zool[ogical]. Proc[eedings]. you can cut these up if you want "extracts."3

[2] I hope you do not very much want the Aru pig to be a domestic animal run wild,— because I have no doubt myself it was the species peculiar to the New Guinea fauna (Sus papuensis. Less.) a very distinct form. I have no doubt it is this species though I did not get it myself there, because I was told that on a small island near called there "Pulo babi" (pig Is.) [Pulau Babi] was a race of pigs (different from & larger than those of the large islands) which had originated from the wreck of a large ship near a century ago— The productions of the Aru Islands closely resemble those of New Guinea, — more [3] than half the species of mammals & birds being identical, as well as about half of the few known mammals.

I am beginning to work at some semi-mechanical work, drawing up catalogues of parts of my collection for publication.

I enclose my "carte". Have you a photograph of yourself of any kind you can send me? When you come to Town next may I beg the honour of a sitting for my brother-in-law Mr. Sims,4 76, Westbourne Grove.

Yours very sincerely | Alfred R. Wallace [signature]

C. Darwin Esq.

[4] P.S. Your paper on Lythrum salicaria, is most beautiful.5 What a wonderful plant it is! I long to hear your paper on Thursday on Tendrils & hear what you have got out of them. My old friend Spruce6 a good botanist & close observer could probably supply you with some facts on that or other botanical subjects if you would write to him. He is now at Kew but almost as ill as yourself.

ARW. [signature]

The Darwin Correspondence Project have established the year of 1865 as the correct date for this letter. See DCP-LETT-4759.
Wallace, A. R. 1864. On the Varieties of Man in the Malay Archipelago. Transactions of the Ethnological Society of London 3: (n.s.). 196-215.

See Wallace, A. R. 1862. List of Birds From the Sula Islands (East of Celebes), With Descriptions of the New Species. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1862: 333-346; Wallace, A. R. 1863. List of Birds Collected in the Island of Bouru (One of the Moluccas), With Descriptions of the New Species. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1863: 18-36; Wallace, A. R. 1863. A List of the Birds Inhabiting the Islands of Timor, Flores, and Lombock, With Descriptions of the New Species. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1863: 480-497.

Wallace, A. R. 1863. List of Birds Collected in the Island of Bouru (One of the Moluccas), With Descriptions of the New Species. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London (1863): 18-36

Sims, Thomas (1826-1910). Brother-in-law of ARW; photographer.
Darwin, C. R. 1864. On the Sexual Relations of the Three Forms of Lythrum salicaria. Journal of the Linnean Society of London (Botany) 8: 169-196.
Spruce, Richard (1817-1893). British botanist, explorer and collector in the Amazon; lifelong friend of ARW.

Transcription (WCP1862.1752)

[1]1

5, Westbourne Grove Terrace,

W.

Jan. 31st. (1865?)

Dear Darwin

Many thanks for your kind letter. I send you now a few more papers. One on "Man" is not much in your line. The other three 3 are Bird lists, but in the introductory remarks are a few facts of Distribution that may be of use to you, & as you have them already in the Zool. Proc. you can cut these up if you want "extracts".

I hope you do not very muhc want the Aru pig to be a domestic animal run wild, — because I have no doubt myself it was the species peculiar to the New Guinea fauna (Sus papuensis. Less.) a very distinct form. I have no doubt it is this species though I did not get it myself there, because I was told that on a small island near called there "Pulobabi "Pulo babi" (pig Is.) was a race of pigs (different from & larger than those of the large islands) which had originated from the wreck of a large ship near a century ago. The productions of the Aru Islands closely resemble those of New Guinea,- more than half the species of birds being identical, as well as about haf of the few known mammals.

I am beginning to work at some semi-mechanical work, drawing up catalogues of parts of my collection of rpublication.

I enclose my "carte". Have you a photograph of yourself of any kind you can send me? When you come to town next may I beg the honour of a sitting for my brother-in-law Mr Sims, 76, Westbourne Grove.

Yours very sincerely | Alfred R. Wallace

[2] P.S. Your paper on Lythrum Salicarlais, is most beautiful. What a wonderful plant it is! I long to hear your paper on Tendrils & hear what you have got out of them. My old friend Spruce a good botanist & clos[sic] observer could probably supply you with some facts on that or other botanical subjects if you would write to him. He is now at Kew but almost as ill as yourself. A.R.W.

Typed transcript.

Transcription (WCP1862.4527)

[1]

To C. Darwin.) 5, Westbourne Grove Terrace, W. Jan. 31st. (1865?)

Dear Darwin

Many thanks for your kind letter. I send you now a few more papers. One on "Man"1 is not such in your line. The other three 3 are bird lists, but in the introductory remarks are a few facts of Distribution that may be of use to you, & as you have them already in the Zool. Proc. You can cut these up if you want "extracts".

I hope you do not very much want the Aru pig to be a domestic animal run wild, — because I have no doubt myself it was the species peculiar to the New Guinea fauna (Sus papuensis. Less.) a very distinct form. I have no doubt it is this species though I did not get it myself there, because I was told that on a small island near called there [1 illegible typewritten word crossed out] "Pulo babi" (pig Is.) was a race of pigs (different from & larger than those of the large islands) which had originated from the wreck of a large ship near a century ago. The productions of the Aru Islands closely resemble those of New Guinea, — more than half the species of birds being identical, as well as about half of the few known mammals.

I am beginning to work at some semi-mechanical work, drawing up catalogues of parts of my collection for publication.

I enclose my "carte". Have you a photograph of yourself of any kind you can send me? When you come to town next may I beg the honour of a sitting for my brother-in-law Mr Sims2, 73, Westbourne Grove.

Yours very sincerely | Alfred R. Wallace.

P.S. Your paper on Lythrum Salicaria3, is most beautiful. What a wonderful plant it is! I long to hear your paper on Tendrils4 & hear what you have got out of them. My old friend Spruce a good botanist & clos[e] observer could probably supply you with some facts on that or other botanical subjects if you would write to him. He is now at Kew but almost as ill as yourself. A.R.W.

Refers to Wallace’s essay titled "On the varieties of man in the Malay Archipelago," which chronicled his 1854 — 1862 voyage
Thomas Sims, married Wallace’s older sister Frances
Common name "purple loosestrife," a flowering plant 1-1.5m tall
Refers to Darwin’s paper on climbing plants completed in 1864

Published letter (WCP1862.5945)

[1] [p. 161]

5 Westbourne Grove Terrace, W, January 31, (1865?),

Dear Darwin,— Many thanks for your kind letter. I send you now a few more papers. One on Man is not much in your line. The other three are bird lists, but in the introductory remarks are a few facts of distribution that may be of use to you, and as you have them already in the Zoological Proceedings, you can cut these up if you want "extracts."

I hope you do not very much want the Aru pig to be a domestic animal run wild, because I have no doubt myself it was the species peculiar to the New Guinea fauna (Sus papuensis, Less.), a very distinct form. I have no doubt it is this species, though I did not get it myself there, because I was told that on a small island near, called there Pulo babi (Pig Island), was a race of pigs (different from and larger than those of the large islands) which had originated from the wreck of a large ship near a century ago. The productions of the Aru Islands closely resemble those of New Guinea, more than half the species of birds being identical, as well as about half of the few known mammals.

I am beginning to Work at some semi-mechanical work, drawing up catalogues of parts of my collection for publication.

I enclose my "carte." Have you a photograph of yourself of any kind you can send me? When you come to town next, may I beg the honour of a sitting for my brother-in-law, Mr. Sims, 73 Westbourne Grove? — Yours very sincerely, ALFRED R. WALLACE.

P.S. —Your paper on Lythrum salicaria1 is most beautiful. What a wonderful plant it is! I long to hear your paper on Tendrils and hear what you have got out of them. My old friend Spruce, a good botanist and close observer, [2] [p. 162] could probably supply you with some facts on that or other botanical subjects if you would Write to him. He is now at Kew, but almost as ill as yourself. — A. R. W.

Please cite as “WCP1862,” in Beccaloni, G. W. (ed.), Ɛpsilon: The Alfred Russel Wallace Collection accessed on 15 July 2024, https://epsilon.ac.uk/view/wallace/letters/WCP1862