WCP1933

Letter (WCP1933.1823)

[1]

Down Beckenham

Kent

Ap[ril] 20 [1870]1

My dear Wallace

I have just received y[ou]r book2 & read the preface. There never has been passed on me, or indeed on any one, a higher eulogium than yours. I wish that I fully deserved it. Your modesty and candour are very far from new to me. I hope it is a satisfaction to you to reflect,— & very few things in my life have been more [2] satisfactory to me— that we have never felt any jealousy towards each other, though in one sense rivals. I believe that I can say this of myself with truth, & I am absolutely sure that it is true of you.

You have been a good Christian to give a list of y[ou]r additions, for I want much to read them, & I should hardly have had time just at present to have gone thro' all y[ou]r articles. [3] Of course I shall immediately read those that are new or greatly altered, & I will endeavour to be as honest as can reasonably be expected. Your book looks remarkably well got up.

Believe me my dear Wallace | to remain | yours very cordially | Ch. Darwin [signature]

A red crayon annotation in the upper right-hand corner of page 1 adds '1870'. The year of 1870 has been established as the correct date by the Darwin Correspondence Project see DCP-LETT-7167.
A red crayon superscript annotation adds '(Natural Selection)' above the text ' y[ou]r book'. See Wallace, A. R. 1870. Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection. London, UK: Macmillan & Co.

Published letter (WCP1933.6018)

[1] [p. 252]

Down, Beckenham, Kent. April 20, (1870).

My dear Wallace. — I have just received your book ("Natural Selection")1,2 and read the preface. There never has been passed on me, or indeed on anyone, a higher eulogium than yours. I wish that I fully deserved it. Your modesty and candour are very far from new to me. I hope it is a satisfaction to you to reflect — and very few things in my life have been more satisfactory to me — that we have never felt any jealousy towards each other, though in one sense rivals. I believe that I can say this of myself with truth, and I am absolutely sure that it is true of you.

You have been a good Christian to give a list of your additions, for I want much to read them, and I should hardly have had time just at present to have gone through all your articles.

Of course, I shall immediately read those that are new or greatly altered, and I will endeavour to be as honest as can reasonably be expected. Your book looks remarkably, well got up. — Believe me, my dear Wallace, to remain yours very cordially, | CH. DARWIN.

Wallace, A.R. (1870) 'Contribution to the Theory of Natural Selection A Series Of Essays' London, UK: Macmillan and co.
At this point there is a footnote: "Inserted by A. R. W."

Published letter (WCP1933.6936)

[1] [p. 237]

In 1870 he had written to me,1 "I hope it is a satisfaction to you to reflect — and very few things in my life have been more satisfactory to me — that we have never felt any jealousy towards each other, though in some sense rivals. I believe I can say this of myself with truth, and I am absolutely sure that it is true of you." This friendly feeling was retained by him to the last, and to have thus inspired and retained it, notwithstanding our many differences of opinion, I feel to be one of the greatest honours of my life.

The following is a quote from WCP1933_P6018.

Please cite as “WCP1933,” in Beccaloni, G. W. (ed.), Ɛpsilon: The Alfred Russel Wallace Collection accessed on 25 September 2022, https://epsilon.ac.uk/view/wallace/letters/WCP1933