WCP1991

Letter (WCP1991.4117)

[1]

Pen-y-bryn, St Peter’s Road, Croydon.

Jany. 29th. 1881

My dear Darwin

Yours just received was very welcome, & the delay in its reaching me is of no importance whatever, as having seen the announcements of the Queen’s approval of the pension of course I felt it was safe. The ante-dating of the first payment, is a very liberal and thoughtful act; but I do not think it is any way exceptional, as regards myself. as I am informed it is the custom because, as no payment is made after the death of the person, if the first payment were delayed, the [2] proposed recipient might die before the ¼[?] year (or quarter-day) & thus receive nothing at all.

I suppose you sent the right address to Mr. Seymour. I have not yet heard from him, but I dare say I shall during next week.

As I am assured both by Miss Buckley & by Prof[essor] Huxley that it is to you that I owe in the first place this great kindness, & that you have also taken an immense amount of trouble to bring it to so successful issue, I must again return you my [3] best thanks, and assure you that there is no one living to whose kindness in such a matter I f could feel myself indebted with so much pleasure & satisfaction.

Believe me, Dear Darwin | Yours very faithfully | Alfred R. Wallace [signature]

Charles Darwin Esq.

Transcription (WCP1991.1881)

[1]1

To C.Darwin.) Pen-y-bryn, St.Peter's Road, Croydon

Jan'y 29th. 1881

My dear Darwin

Yours just received was very welcome, & the delay in its reaching me is of no importance whatever, as having seen the announcement of the Queen's approval of the pension of course I felt it was safe. The anti-dating of the first payment, is a very liberal & thoughtful act; but I do not think it is any way exceptional as regards myself. I am informed it is the custom because, as no payment is made after the death of the person, if the first payment were delayed, the proposed recipient might die before the ½ year (or quarter day) & thus receive nothing at all.

I suppose you sent the right address to Mr Seymour. I have not yet heard from him, but I dare say I shall during the next week.

As I am assured both by Miss Buckley & by Prof. Huxley that it is to you that I owe in the first place this great kindness, & that you have also taken an immense interest amount of trouble to bring it to so successful issue, I must again return you my best thanks, and assure you that there is no one living to whose kindness in such a matter I could feel myself indebted with so much pleasure & satisfaction.

Believe me, Dear darwin, Yours very faithfully | Alfred R. Wallace

The page is numbered (1), and subsequently struck out in pencil.

Transcription (WCP1991.4468)

[1]

To C.Darwin.)Pen-y-bryn, St. Peter’s Road, Croydon. Jan’y 29th. 1881

My dear Darwin

Yours just received was very welcome, & the delay in its reaching me is of no importance whatever, as having seen the announcement of the Queen’s approval of the pension of course I felt it was safe. The anti-dating of the initial payment, is a very liberal & thoughtful <set?>: but I do not think it is any way exceptional as regards myself. I am informed it is the custom because, as no payment is made after the death of the person, if the first payment were delayed, the proposed recipient might die before the <1> year (or quarter day) & thus receive nothing at all.

I suppose you sent the right address to Mr Seymour. I have not yet heard from him, but I dare say I shall during the next week.

As I am asoured[sic] both by Miss Buckley & by Prof. Huxley1 that it is to you that I have in the first place this great blindness, & that you have also taken an immense amount of trouble to bring it to so successful issue, I must again return you my best thanks, and assure you that there is no one living to whose kindness in such a matter I could feel myself indebted with so much pleasure & satisfaction.

Believe me | Dear darwin | Yours very faithfully | Alfred R. Wallace

Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895) was an English anatomist and a major advocate of Darwin’s theory of evolution.

Published letter (WCP1991.6247)

[1] [p. 315]

Pen-y-bryn, St. Peter's Road, Croydon. January 29, 1881.

My dear Darwin, — Yours just received was very welcome, and the delay in its reaching me is of no importance whatever, as, having seen the announcement of the Queen's approval of the pension, of course I felt it was safe. The [2] [p. 316] antedating of the first payment is a very liberal and thoughtful act; but I do not think it is any way exceptional as regards myself. I am informed it is the custom because, as no payment is made after the death of the person, if the first payment were delayed the proposed recipient might die before the half-year (or quarter-day) and thus receive nothing at all.

I suppose you sent the right address to Mr. Seymour. I have not yet heard from him, but I daresay I shall during the next week.

As I am assured both by Miss Buckley1 and by Prof. Huxley2 that it is to you that I owe in the first place this great kindness, and that you have also taken an immense amount of trouble to bring it to so successful issue, I must again return you my best thanks, and assure you that there is no one living to whose kindness in such a matter I could feel myself indebted with so much pleasure and satisfaction. — Believe me, dear Darwin, | yours very faithfully, | ALFRED R. WALLACE.

Buckley (nee Fisher), Arabella Burton (1840-1929). British writer, science educator and spiritualist.
Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825-1895). British biologist known as "Darwin's Bulldog".

Please cite as “WCP1991,” in Beccaloni, G. W. (ed.), Ɛpsilon: The Alfred Russel Wallace Collection accessed on 4 June 2023, https://epsilon.ac.uk/view/wallace/letters/WCP1991